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The Times is a British daily national newspaper based in London.
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The Times is a British daily national newspaper based in London. It began in under the title The Daily Universal Register , adopting its current name on 1 January The Times and The Sunday Times , which do not share editorial staff, were founded independently, and have only had common ownership since The Times is the first newspaper to have borne that name, lending it to numerous other papers around the world, such as The Times of India and The New York Times.

In countries where these other titles are popular, the newspaper is often referred to as The London Times , [6] [7] or as The Times of London , [8] although the newspaper is of national scope and distribution. The Times had an average daily circulation of , in January ; [9] in the same period, The Sunday Times had an average weekly circulation of , A complete historical file of the digitised paper, up to , is online from Gale Cengage Learning. Unemployed, Walter began a new business venture. Walter bought the logography's patent and with it opened a printing house to produce books.

Walter changed the title after editions on 1 January to The Times. The Times used contributions from significant figures in the fields of politics, science, literature, and the arts to build its reputation. For much of its early life, the profits of The Times were very large and the competition minimal, so it could pay far better than its rivals for information or writers. Beginning in , the paper was printed on the new steam-driven cylinder press developed by Friedrich Koenig.

Thomas Barnes was appointed general editor in In the same year, the paper's printer James Lawson, died and passed the business onto his son John Joseph Lawson — Under the editorship of Barnes and his successor in , John Thadeus Delane , the influence of The Times rose to great heights, especially in politics and amongst the City of London.

The increased circulation and influence of the paper was based in part to its early adoption of the steam-driven rotary printing press. Distribution via steam trains to rapidly growing concentrations of urban populations helped ensure the profitability of the paper and its growing influence. The Times was one of the first newspapers to send war correspondents to cover particular conflicts.

William Howard Russell , the paper's correspondent with the army in the Crimean War , was immensely influential with his dispatches back to England. Due to legal fights between the Britannica's two owners, Hooper and Walter Montgomery Jackson , The Times severed its connection in and was bought by pioneering newspaper magnate , Alfred Harmsworth , later Lord Northcliffe. What are these 'Protocols'? Are they authentic? If so, what malevolent assembly concocted these plans and gloated over their exposition?

Are they forgery? If so, whence comes the uncanny note of prophecy, prophecy in part fulfilled, in part so far gone in the way of fulfillment? The following year, when Philip Graves , the Constantinople modern Istanbul correspondent of The Times , exposed The Protocols as a forgery, [26] The Times retracted the editorial of the previous year. The paper gained a measure of notoriety in the s with its advocacy of German appeasement ; editor Geoffrey Dawson was closely allied with those in the government who practised appeasement, most notably Neville Chamberlain.

Candid news reports by Norman Ebbut from Berlin that warned of warmongering were rewritten in London to support the appeasement policy. Kim Philby , a double agent with primary allegiance to the Soviet Union , was a correspondent for the newspaper in Spain during the Spanish Civil War of the late s. Philby was admired for his courage in obtaining high-quality reporting from the front lines of the bloody conflict. Between and , the left-wing British historian E. Carr was assistant editor. Carr was well known for the strongly pro-Soviet tone of his editorials.

On 3 May , it resumed printing news on the front page — previously the front page had been given over to small advertisements, usually of interest to the moneyed classes in British society.

Also in , the Royal Arms , which had been a feature of the newspaper's masthead since its inception, was abandoned. An industrial dispute prompted the management to shut the paper for nearly a year from 1 December to 12 November The Thomson Corporation management were struggling to run the business due to the energy crisis and union demands.

Management sought a buyer who was in a position to guarantee the survival of both titles, and had the resources and was committed to funding the introduction of modern printing methods. Several suitors appeared, including Robert Maxwell , Tiny Rowland and Lord Rothermere ; however, only one buyer was in a position to meet the full Thomson remit, Australian media magnate Rupert Murdoch.

Murdoch gave legal undertakings to maintain separate journalism resources for the two titles. After 14 years as editor, William Rees-Mogg resigned upon completion of the change of ownership.

Between March and May , following agreement with print unions, the hot-metal Linotype printing process used to print The Times since the 19th century was phased out and replaced by computer input and photo-composition. However, direct input of text by journalists "single-stroke" input was still not achieved, and this was to remain an interim measure until the Wapping dispute of , when The Times moved from New Printing House Square in Gray's Inn Road near Fleet Street to new offices in Wapping.

Robert Fisk , [42] seven times British International Journalist of the Year, [43] resigned as foreign correspondent in over what he saw as "political censorship" of his article on the shooting-down of Iran Air Flight in July He wrote in detail about his reasons for resigning from the paper due to meddling with his stories, and the paper's pro-Israel stance. In June , The Times ceased its policy of using courtesy titles "Mr", "Mrs", or "Miss" prefixes for living persons before full names on first reference, but it continues to use them before surnames on subsequent references.

In , it accepted the use of "Ms" for unmarried women "if they express a preference. In November , News International began producing the newspaper in both broadsheet and tabloid sizes. Since 1 November , the paper has been printed solely in tabloid format. On 6 June , The Times redesigned its Letters page, dropping the practice of printing correspondents' full postal addresses. Published letters were long regarded as one of the paper's key constituents. According to its leading article "From Our Own Correspondents", the reason for removal of full postal addresses was to fit more letters onto the page.

In a meeting with the House of Lords Select Committee on Communications, which was investigating media ownership and the news, Murdoch stated that the law and the independent board prevented him from exercising editorial control. In May , printing of The Times switched from Wapping to new plants at Waltham Cross in Hertfordshire , and Merseyside and Glasgow , enabling the paper to be produced with full colour on every page for the first time.

On 26 July , to coincide with the official start of the London Olympics and the issuing of a series of souvenir front covers, The Times added the suffix "of London" to its masthead. In March , the paper dropped its rolling digital coverage for a series of 'editions' of the paper at 9am, midday and 5pm on weekday.

In April , Culture secretary Jeremy Wright said he was minded to allow a request by News UK to relax the legal undertakings given in to maintain separate journalism resources for The Times and The Sunday Times. In , IPSO upheld complaints against The Times over their article "GPS data shows container visited trafficking hotspot", [56] and for three articles as part of a series on pollution in Britain's waterways — "No river safe for bathing", "Filthy Business" and "Behind the story". In , IPSO upheld a complaint against The Times for an article headlined "Seven sex attacks in women's jails by transgender inmates".

The sport section is at the end of the main paper. The Times ' main supplement, every day, is the times2 , featuring various columns. Its previous incarnation began on 5 September , before which it was called T2 and previously Times 2. The newspaper employs Richard Morrison as its classical music critic.

The Saturday edition of The Times contains a variety of supplements. These supplements were relaunched in January as: Sport , Weekend including travel and lifestyle features , Saturday Review arts, books, TV listings and ideas , The Times Magazine columns on various topics , and Playlist an entertainment listings guide. The Times Magazine features columns touching on various subjects such as celebrities, fashion and beauty, food and drink, homes and gardens or simply writers' anecdotes.

The Times and The Sunday Times have had an online presence since March , originally at the-times. There are also iPad and Android editions of both newspapers. The Times has had the following eight owners since its foundation in [73]. John Walter , the founder of The Times. John Walter, 2nd. John Walter, 3rd. Lord Northcliffe. Roy Thomson. At the time of Harold Evans' appointment as editor in , The Times had an average daily sale of , copies in comparison to the 1. In contrast The Sun , the highest-selling "tabloid" daily newspaper in the United Kingdom, sold an average of 2,, copies in March , [79] and the Daily Mail , the highest-selling "middle market" British daily newspaper, sold an average of 1,, copies in the period.

In a national readership survey, The Times was found to have the highest number of ABC1 25—44 readers and the largest numbers of readers in London of any of the "quality" papers. The Times is the originator of the widely used Times New Roman typeface, originally developed by Stanley Morison of The Times in collaboration with the Monotype Corporation for its legibility in low-tech printing. The Times was printed in broadsheet format for years, but switched to compact size in in an attempt to appeal more to younger readers and commuters using public transport.

The Sunday Times remains a broadsheet. They were a suite of types originally made by Miller and Co. When The Times began using Monotype and other hot-metal machines in , this design was remade by Monotype for its equipment. As near as I can tell, it looks like Monotype Series no. In , The Times started using the Monotype Modern typeface. Morison used an older font named Plantin as the basis for his design, but made revisions for legibility and economy of space. Times New Roman made its debut in the issue of 3 October The Times stayed with Times New Roman for 40 years, but new production techniques and the format change from broadsheet to tabloid in have caused the newspaper to switch font five times since However, all the new fonts have been variants of the original New Roman font:.

Historically, the paper was not overtly pro- Tory or Whig , but has been a long time bastion of the English Establishment and empire. In , the historian of journalism Allan Nevins analysed the importance of The Times in shaping the views of events of London's elite:. For much more than a century The Times has been an integral and important part of the political structure of Great Britain. Its news and its editorial comment have in general been carefully coordinated, and have at most times been handled with an earnest sense of responsibility.

While the paper has admitted some trivia to its columns, its whole emphasis has been on important public affairs treated with an eye to the best interests of Britain. To guide this treatment, the editors have for long periods been in close touch with 10 Downing Street. The Times adopted a stance described as "peculiarly detached" at the general election ; although it was increasingly critical of the Conservative Party 's campaign, it did not advocate a vote for any one party.

It supported the Conservatives for the subsequent three elections, followed by support for both the Conservatives and the Liberal Party for the next five elections, expressly supporting a Con-Lib coalition in The paper then backed the Conservatives solidly until , when it declined to make any party endorsement but supported individual primarily Eurosceptic candidates. For the general election , The Times declared its support for Tony Blair 's Labour government, which was re-elected by a landslide although not as large as in



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